14 Comments

The lawlessness and brutality of the cartels also filters down to small non-narco gangs that act with impunity due to the ineffective judicial system in Mexico.

These gangs kidnap, extort and murder knowing the possibility of getting caught is negligible. This is just another layer of criminal activity that goes mostly unnoticed because the cartels take precedent with the media and law enforcement.

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This is more chilling than Stephen King. And you found those barrels! A disturbing and fascinating read.

At a tangent, you'll find this interesting - druggy Hitler and Germany WW2 heroin, cocaine, oxy and meth - https://www.npr.org/transcripts/518986612

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Nov 15, 2023Liked by Ioan Grillo

"Mexico’s 400,000 murder victims since 2006".... Largely unacknowledged in USA, for contrast USA experienced 407,316 deaths in WW2

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Nov 18, 2023Liked by Ioan Grillo

Ioan, I don't think war crimes trials in the past have been too successful nor just. World Court in the Hague is a perfect example of selective prosecution ignoring the real culprits of the genocides. The Nuremburg trials was extremely limited basically to Nazi's who could not offer, primarily the US, skills that was needed by the Allies. Certainly very few individuals could convince a country to ignore the past violence done to them like Nelson Mandela did in South Africa. But those desires for revenge fueled with the ideas of justice did not go away in South Africa and the attacks on whites and their farms has reignited. President Tito because of his past actions and his strength kept Yugoslavia together but when he died the country exploded in violence.

Soviet Union's collapse and a complete down spin into violence and corruption is very similar to Mexico now and of course Russia's collapse was ended by the strong leader in Putin. The sad reality is the lawlessness not only of cartels but also of the government does not lead to many non-violent solutions that could work.

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Nov 18, 2023Liked by Ioan Grillo

I would call the horrible violence in Mexico as another terrible example of the extreme arrogance of power where they tolerate no opposition and any slight they take to the most extreme levels of personal hatred resulting in death. They know instilling fear will enhance their power and force cooperation from everyone around. This extreme violence can also be an expression of vengeance resulting from class and cultural hatred against anyone who dares to challenge their authority.

Unfortunately history has been littered with these explosions of mass violence. From Idi Amin in Uganda, Jean Bokassa of the Central African Republic, Macias Ngueno of Equatorial Guinea, Papa Doc Duvalier in Haiti, Mao Sedung on his march of victory 1945-1947, Mau Mau uprising in Kenya and a very huge explosion of violence in a short time in Rwanda 1992. These explosions result from a previous history of tribal and ethnic violence resulting from the colonial designs of European powers. Mexico's colonial history was riddled with violence, corruption and class violence. The violence of Nazi Germany and Stalin in Soviet Union was more calculated and direct expression of planned political control. Mexico's government is in collusion with the violence and corruption. This subject has been examined by Hannah Arendt in her book "Origins of Totalitarianism" focusing on Nazi Germany and Stalin and Franz Fanon who was focused on the people subject to colonial violence.

Mexico's political system is rotten to the core and I think we are at the situation where it will take the power and control of a Bukele type leader to crush the violence that is occurring in Mexico. That type of leader is also going to have to expand it's tactics in not only suppressing the agents of violence but to crush the banking system that supports this violence. It is very possible that the idea of nationalizing your financial institutions will be the ultimate expression of freedom.

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